Aya Academy of Excellence


Interactive Game Board

Image

 

Although recall is at the bottom level of Blooms Taxonomy, creating a baseline understanding of key people and significant events is instrumental in creating the foundations for critical thinking.  You can take the simple matching activity up a notch by having your learners construct an interactive game board using basic materials you can find at the dollar store.or hardware store.

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Type up a two-column matching activity board.  We created one to review 20 African American Scientists. (click the title to get a free copy of the PDF.)
  2. Hole punch a circle next to each entry in both columns.
  3. Cut thin strips of aluminum foil.  Attach foil using transparent tape to the back of board.  Cover each foil strip completely before attaching the next strip. Each end of the foil should appear through the opening of each hole punch to connect the correct answers of each column.
  4. Insert a D battery into a casing.  Attach wire to each end of the casing.  One wire will attach to a light bulb and mini clamp; the other wire will be attached to a mini clamp only.
  5. When the clamps touch to the correct combination from column A and column B, the light bulb is lit.

I used this activity in class a few years ago with middle-schoolers.  This is one of the family engagement activities we will use to provide families an opportunity to reinforce learning.  During one session, families will create 3 blank templates that can be interchangeably used for different classes.  

Advertisements

Tools of the Trade: Story Chips

20140207-182407.jpg

A few years ago, I stumbled across a lovely resource to spark discussion during literacy workshops.Story Chips and Discussion chips are an affordable teaching tool to encourage learners to share their thoughts in small and large group settings. Since learners can select their questions, they feel a degree of ownership during the discussion process.

The chips, which retail for less than $5 at teacher resource stores, can be made at home. The questions are based on Bloom’s Taxonomy, and therefore, they have several levels of thinking ranging from recall to analytical inquiry. In class, I would allow learners a chance to swap questions out from the chips bucket to ensure they selected questions they were comfortable responding to in front of a group. While reading Julia Alvarez’ Before We Were Free, each student was paired with a partner and answered the questions together. The partners were allowed to first discuss with their buddy their individual responses to create a consensus before sharing out to the larger group. As always, getting to the ‘right’ answer took a back seat to developing students’ ability to think critically and dialogue with peers.

To make your own, create questions in Microsoft word to fit into a text box the size of a 20 ounce bottle cap (Vitamin Water). Glue the questions onto the bottle cap and Voila, you’ve saved $5!

What I love most is that these chips can be used with any age learner and within any setting. Families can have these on hand
at their bedside table to use during bedtime reading.



%d bloggers like this: