Aya Academy of Excellence


Tutoring for Children Who HATE Tutoring

Tutoring for Children Who HATE Tutoring

Aya Academy of Excellence’s Saturday Academy is a year-round programming for students who need to CATCH UP, KEEP UP and GET AHEAD. What makes Saturday Academy different? Unlike traditional skill and drill tutoring programs, Saturday Academy invests in having learners fall in love with learning. Skill development is achieved through the engagement of hands-on, highly interactive experiences. Saturday Academy deftly weaves together the use of science investigations, literature and digital explorations to foster each student’s academic development.

Are you ready for your kids to fall in love with reading, science and math? If so, join in a future session at Aya Academy of Excellence’s Saturday Academy small group tutoring program.


Atlanta Surges Into the STEM Sector

 

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On Friday, March 21, 2014, the city of Atlanta kicked off an eight-day celebration of all things STEM.  The event, The Atlanta Science Festival, was over two years in the making, according to one of its co-founders Jordan Rose of Emory University.  The leadership team and advisory committee pulled together several dozen disparate organizations throughout the region to provide educators, families and scholars a glimpse into the emerging STEM sector that has been embraced by the nation and that has been heavily courted by the city.  The old guard, including Georgia Tech and Emory University, leaders in engineering and bio-medicine, stood side-by-side with institutions which have newly recognized the significance of the sciences in other fields.

Throughout the week, the doors to community-wide centers were open to showcase ongoing programs and to provide support and engagement opportunities to the public.  Within three days, I traversed across throughout the city to participate in some of the most feted events offered during the festival.

Last year, during our Summer’s Cool academic camp, my students and I visited the Carlos C. Museum while we toured the campus of Emory University.  The three story museum’s collection spans thousands of years several continents.  The smattering of artifacts, including African masks, embalmed Egyptian mummies and  shards of Greco-Roman vases, became the featured resources of integrated STEM lessons.  Using a problem-based approach, students engage in an inquiry based on conservation methods employed by museums.  The teachers who presented during the event were highly enthusiastic about the activities they created.  Among the several showcased that evening, the fibers inquiry to test the acidity of paper was  the most accessible to all learners. This activity, which also included a reading about the Egyptian goddess Isis, would undoubtedly pique the interest of young people in the classroom.

The following day, I scooped up my ladybugs and headed over to Spelman College to see their all-girls robotics team, SpelBots.  The auditorium-filled expanse of giggly tikes were amused by Sugar and Spice, the two humanoid robots which responded to audio commands.  The kids were amazed by how the robots were able to move and interact with the people in the room.

Our three-day exploration into STEM was rounded out by a visit to the stellar Tellus Museum. This science center includes galleries featuring dinosaur fossil replicas, remnants from space shuttles and minerals from around the world. My ladybugs were enamored with the hands-on children’s learning gallery.  Within it, they were able to participate in several investigations related to light, meteorology and energy.  Although we did not have an opportunity to visit the onsite planetarium, we did have a chance to explore the Solar House constructed in 2002 by a team of Georgia Tech students. This phenomenal space showcased how different energy choices can positively impact our environment, including the use of LED lights, water cisterns and celestories.

Kudos to the Atlanta Science Festival team for delivering a high octane STEM experience to the city of Atlanta.  I’m sure this is only the beginning.

 


Smoothie Science

Smoothie Science

This is a short and sweet, lol at making an in intended pun at 2am, post about a lesson incorporating science and the culinary arts.

I went on a personal detox a few weeks ago, and as always, Pinterest was my greatest friend. I decided that I wanted to radically reduce the presence of refined sugars, processed food and meat…I did not last long. The pull of Chipotle’s chicken bowl was too dang great. Alas, the journey was not entirely fruitless…ok, I’m going to start posting at 2am from now on. While concocting numerous versions of the same drink, I thought that kids would love creating their own drinks too. And as I explored the concept of ‘super foods’ I realized that this would be a prime opportunity for students to analyze the caloric intake of foods as a math lesson and the impact of various nutrients on the body as a science lesson.

Here’s how the scholars I’ll be demoing this for later today will approach the learning.

1. In small groups, let kids taste an array of fruits and veggies. Have the students rate the selections according to their sweetness and texture.

2. Have the groups select one base – coconut water or unsweetened almon milk.

3. Have each group choose three of the selections. (I’m thinking that the next time I do this I will give each group a specific challenge – Make a Smoothie for Someone Seeking to Improve To Improve Their Immune System, for example.)

4. Assist the kids in conducting research on the nutritive properties of their fruits and vegetables. The goal is for the students to balance between eating foods just because they taste good and eating foods due to their ability to improve one’a health. Students should pay attention to the impact of various vitamins and minerals.

5. Using an online food calorie counter, have students record the caloric intake of their smoothie recipe.

6. Here’s the fun part. For the math, we will have the students ‘burn off their calories’ by jumping rope and will have each group compare their smoothies caloric intake against the other groups. If time permits, we’ll through in a ‘what if’ challenge. I’m thinking we can ask each scholar to increase their smoothies caloric intake by 25% and will ask them how they can modify their recipes to make that possible – ie add another fruit or vegetable.

7. Each group will document their learning on a poster with the recipe, fruit and vegetable nutritive facts, caloric intake and their jump rope statistics.

This should be a blast and I will post a pic of the kids in action later. I definitely want this activity as one of our Community Classroom family engagement workshops. I imagine that families would have a fun time participating in this learning too.

Peace and Joy,
Stephanie



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