Aya Academy of Excellence


Smoothie Science

Smoothie Science

This is a short and sweet, lol at making an in intended pun at 2am, post about a lesson incorporating science and the culinary arts.

I went on a personal detox a few weeks ago, and as always, Pinterest was my greatest friend. I decided that I wanted to radically reduce the presence of refined sugars, processed food and meat…I did not last long. The pull of Chipotle’s chicken bowl was too dang great. Alas, the journey was not entirely fruitless…ok, I’m going to start posting at 2am from now on. While concocting numerous versions of the same drink, I thought that kids would love creating their own drinks too. And as I explored the concept of ‘super foods’ I realized that this would be a prime opportunity for students to analyze the caloric intake of foods as a math lesson and the impact of various nutrients on the body as a science lesson.

Here’s how the scholars I’ll be demoing this for later today will approach the learning.

1. In small groups, let kids taste an array of fruits and veggies. Have the students rate the selections according to their sweetness and texture.

2. Have the groups select one base – coconut water or unsweetened almon milk.

3. Have each group choose three of the selections. (I’m thinking that the next time I do this I will give each group a specific challenge – Make a Smoothie for Someone Seeking to Improve To Improve Their Immune System, for example.)

4. Assist the kids in conducting research on the nutritive properties of their fruits and vegetables. The goal is for the students to balance between eating foods just because they taste good and eating foods due to their ability to improve one’a health. Students should pay attention to the impact of various vitamins and minerals.

5. Using an online food calorie counter, have students record the caloric intake of their smoothie recipe.

6. Here’s the fun part. For the math, we will have the students ‘burn off their calories’ by jumping rope and will have each group compare their smoothies caloric intake against the other groups. If time permits, we’ll through in a ‘what if’ challenge. I’m thinking we can ask each scholar to increase their smoothies caloric intake by 25% and will ask them how they can modify their recipes to make that possible – ie add another fruit or vegetable.

7. Each group will document their learning on a poster with the recipe, fruit and vegetable nutritive facts, caloric intake and their jump rope statistics.

This should be a blast and I will post a pic of the kids in action later. I definitely want this activity as one of our Community Classroom family engagement workshops. I imagine that families would have a fun time participating in this learning too.

Peace and Joy,
Stephanie



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